Presenting the Eddie Bravo Invitational (EBI) Combat Jiu-Jitsu Worlds 1. Eddie Bravo is the owner of 10th Planet Jiu-jitsu and is very well known for his rubber guard system. He created EBI which is a submission only grappling tournament. Later the organization added Combat Jiu-Jitsu (CJJ). The rules in CJJ allow open palm strikes. This changes everything when it comes to pure grappling. Athletes now have to be aware of strikes and this makes them more vulnerable to submissions. Fights can end with a submission or also a stoppage due to strikes. People with Mixed Martial Arts training are able to make the transition quite well. For the pure grappler, it is more difficult since they are not used to being hit. Although there are almost no rules strikes to the back of the head or the groin area are still not permitted.  

From all the rules it is the get down rule that stands out the most. It is applied when two athletes spend more than two minutes on their feet without engaging the referee will force them to the ground. A coin toss will decide which athlete gets to choose top or bottom position. This is great because it will push athletes to stay active and engage more.

Combat Jiu-Jitsu Worlds 1 featured a total of sixteen fighters with performances by former UFC fighter Tyson Griffin, current UFC fighter Vagner Rocha, and defending (CJJ) bantamweight champion Nick Honstein.

This was the first Combat Jiu-Jitsu event. It took place in Los Angeles, California on Nov. 12, 2017. Eddie Bravo brings back the old school days of Jiu-jitsu, and Vale Tudo. Some would argue that those were the glory days and when Jiu-jitsu was in its purest form. Back in those days, Jiu-jitsu was used for self-defense.

For competitive grapplers trying to make the transition into the sport of MMA, the Eddie Bravo CJJ is a great way for athletes to get their ‘’feet wet’’ before going to full combat with kicks, elbows, knees, and fist strikes.